header
header
header
header

ООН Надежный партнер Часть 1 

World Humanitarian Day, 19 August 2016

Every day, humanitarian aid workers stand on the front lines of war and disaster, braving tremendous dangers and difficulties to deliver assistance to those who need it most. World Humanitarian Day (WHD), which takes place every year on 19 August, recognizes the aid workers who risk their lives in humanitarian service, and mobilizes people to advocate for humanitarian action. The day was designated by the General Assembly seven years ago to coincide with the anniversary of the 2003 bombing of the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad, Iraq.

This World Humanitarian Day, the UN and its partners are calling for global solidarity with the more than 130 million people around the world who need humanitarian assistance to survive. Under the theme of ‘One Humanity’, World Humanitarian Day will highlight how the world came together in Istanbul for the World Humanitarian Summit earlier this year, and made commitments to support people affected by crisis and ensure that aid workers can safely and more effectively deliver to those in need.

Events will be held around the world on 19 August to honor the work of humanitarian workers and to celebrate the theme of ‘One Humanity’. In New York, a wreath-laying ceremony will take place at the United Nations headquarters, and a high-level event will be held in the General Assembly Hall. In addition a digital campaign will be launched on the day to raise awareness of the impossible choices that people caught in crisis face. World Humanitarian Day will also feature photo exhibitions and film screenings documenting the lives of those affected by conflict and disaster.

Background

In December 2008, the sixty-third session of the UN General Assembly decided to designate 19 August as World Humanitarian Day.19 August is the date on which a brutal terrorist attack on UN headquarters in Baghdad in 2003 killed 22 people, including UN envoy Sergio Vieira de Mello.

World Humanitarian Day honors those, who have lost their lives in humanitarian service and those, who continue to bring assistance and relief to millions.The Day also seeks to draw attention to humanitarian needs worldwide and the importance of international cooperation in meeting these needs.

Every year, disasters cause immense suffering for millions of people – usually the world's poorest, most marginalized and vulnerable individuals.Humanitarian aid workers strive to provide life-saving assistance and long term rehabilitation to disaster-affected communities, regardless of where they are in the world and without discrimination based on nationality, social group, religion, sex, race or any other factor.

Humanitarian aid is based on a number of founding principles, including humanity, impartiality, neutrality and independence. Humanitarian aid workers should be respected, and be able to access those in need in order to provide vital assistance.

Humanitarian aid workers can be international, but most come from the country in which they work.  They reflect all cultures, ideologies and backgrounds and they are united by their commitment to humanitarianism.

Everyone can be a humanitarian. People affected by disasters are often the first to help their own communities following a disaster.

Responding to emergencies is only one aspect of humanitarian work. Humanitarian workers also support communities to rebuild their lives after disasters, to become more resilient to future crises, to advocate for their voices to be heard, and to build lasting and sustainable peace in areas of conflict.

Links to short video on WHD:

WHD Video: https://we.tl/wgdSVZ4We8

SG Message on WHD: https://we.tl/3RV8G1tIy6

 

#fc3424 #5835a1 #1975f2 #2fc86b #fevec9 #eef11239 #060114054720